Moo Sticker engines fixed

A few years ago I create a web app to allow people to order their own sets of Moo stickers with the MQTT, Node-RED and Owntracks(at the time called MQTTitude) logos.

These worked well with people ordering about 1 pack a month until Moo changed the way they did authentication. I didn’t have time to fix it until today.

I’ve moved the app from being a J2EE app over to one written in NodeJS using express, this along with the change in Moo’s authentication method has made the code a lot shorter and easier to read. I’ve published the new code on github here.

To order a set of stickers click on the appropriate image:

Playing with a set of WEMO light bulbs

I’ve been looking things like the Philips Hue since they shipped, but the price had been putting me off (and the fact that they initially only supported iOS devices and only come in screw fit).

When the Belkin WeMo Light Bulbs came round they were a cheaper option and they come in bayonet fit which meant I wouldn’t need to change any of the light fittings in the flat to play with them.

Belkin have created a mobile app to interact with the bulbs, but having to use your phone to turn the light on when you enter a room is bit of a bind. There is a replacement light switch but it’s only available in the US at the moment, so I was looking for other ways to control things. I was looking to hook the lights up to Node-RED so I could drive them based on a whole list of events.

There is a Node-RED node and a bunch of npm modules for controlling WEMO sockets but none of them currently seam to support the light bulbs. So I started to see if I could work out what was needed to get things up and running. As I was going I tweeted some of my progress which led to this exchange:

I decided to not hold my breath while waiting for a useful response and started out with a couple of the existing npm modules.

WEMO devices are all UPNP devices, which means discovering them is actually pretty easy. It also means the interface to interact with them should be pretty self descriptive. The response to the discovery request is a XML document that includes a number of useful things.

  • IP address
  • Port number
  • Unique Device Number
  • List of Services

The list of services has some interesting looking targets, but after some trial and error the bridgeservice turned out to look like the one I wanted. I ended up getting stuck and I was getting ready to set up a separate WiFi network so I could run Wireshark to see how the mobile app was actually driving the lights.

Some sterling work by Jesus Rafael Carrillo (@jescarri on github) on this issue got me the bit of info I was missing.

Taking this I managed to build a simple hard coded app that would turn the lights on and off or set the dim level and the fade times.

EDIT:

Updated here

The next step is to pick one of the existing WEMO npm modules to add this new capability, then update the Node-RED node to go support the new features.