Dirty Kanza 100 2019

I’ve just got back from a pretty great trip.

As I mentioned in a previous post, this year I was going to take part in one of the premier gravel riding events, the Dirty Kanza.

The Trip

I flew out to Denver and spent the first 4 days in Boulder. This was for a few reasons. Firstly it’s somewhere I’ve been wanting to visit for a while as it was one of the options I listed for my year at uni in the US (I suspect that the powers that be knew I’d have spent the whole year snowboarding which is why I ended up in North Carolina…) and I was sure there would be some good riding to shake the flight out of my legs. It’s also at altitude (about a mile above sea level) which I was hoping would help as a final little push (I know you have to spend more than a week at altitude before it actually starts to have a positive effect).

While in town I went on 2 rides led out of the Full Cycle bike shop. The first was a road ride on Saturday morning at 09:00 which covered about 70km in 2 and a bit hours.

It was a nice pace to shake the flight out of my legs and to make sure I’d put the bike back together properly after the flight. The ride was pretty flat and I didn’t have any trouble keeping up with the pace.

The second ride was billed as a gravel ride but had aspects that were closer to a mountain bike single track ride. And this time I really started to feel the altitude as there was a bunch more climbing some of it pretty steep.

Both rides left from the Pearl Street store with at least 2 ride leaders. If you are in town and want somebody to show you some good riding I suggest you head along and see these folk.

I stuck in a repeat of Saturday’s ride on my own on the Monday just to keep the legs turning over as I didn’t fancy doing any major climbing. I also tried to stick a short run in but the the altitude really kicked in and I managed about 4k before deciding that enough was enough while gasping for air.

On Wednesday I set off on the monumental drive across most of Kansas. I had booked a place to stop in a small town called Hays to break up the nearly 600mile drive.

The drive was an experience, I’ve driven round different parts of the US in the past, but either on the East coast or round the US National Parks in the South West, but this was just hour after hour of nearly totally straight flat road. I can totally see the appeal of a self driving (totally, definitely not the current systems that require human oversight) vehicle for this kind of driving.

While stretching my legs when I arrived I happened to catch a train crossing Main Street.

Then on Thursday I finished off the run in to Emporia. While the first 360 miles had been nearly totally flat the ground did finally start to become a little bit more rolling.

The Event

The Dirty Kanza is based out the town of Emporia in East Kansas.

The DK takes over pretty much all of Commercial Street, with pretty much all of the shops getting involved. There is a area between Commercial Street and Mechanics Street where all the sponsors get to set up their stands and you can look at all the new bikes and tech.

On the Friday before the actual event there is a short social ride, I rolled round with everybody before heading off to recy the first 10 miles of the course.

The full 200 mile event starts at 6am (with the dawn) and the 100 mile event starts 30 minutes later so I got to see the folk doing the longer distance set off.

Once they had cleared the starting area, we got to line up to set off.

The ride was a tale of 2 parts, the first 90km to the feed station went really well, cruising along at a steady 23kph and doing just over half the climbing in just under 4 hours. I’d made a decent dent into the 2 750ml drink bottles I had with me. I refilled them both and had a snack to keep the energy up, I spent about 15mins at the rest station. The temperature for the first leg had topped out at about 25 °C.

The second leg was a lot harder covering just short of 80km, the temperature topped out at 35 °C and averaged 32 °C and this meant I burnt through a lot more water. Luckily there were a couple of places along the way where I could top up my bottles again. It also kicked off with one of the bigger climbs of the whole route. There had been a 40% chance of rain (with the possibility of thunder) in the forecast for the afternoon that I had been keeping an eye on all of the week running up to the event, hoping it wouldn’t happen. By the time the temperature passed 30 °C I had changed my mind and scanning the sky for clouds.

I got within 10km of the finish when I had my first and only mechanical issue. My rear tire had nearly fully deflated, but the tubeless sealant had managed to plug the leak so all I needed to do was use a CO2 canister to top it up.

Crossing the DK finish line

The finish line was back down Commercial Street which had been converted into a street party while we had been out on the trail. Lots of people cheering which really helped get over the line.

I would definitely do the DK again, may be even give the full 200mile version a try next time, but that would need a bigger training plan and probably finding a way to spend a good few weeks at altitude in the run up. I would also make use of the third bottle cage mounts on the bike

This year’s challenge

Towards the end of last year I was looking for something a bit different to do in 2019. I’m still going to be doing a bunch of triathlons but I also wanted to have a go at some more endurance events.

I’ve already done a marathon (London in 2016) and I having had my IT band tighten up as I crossed the half way point on Tower Bridge I’m not that interested in doing another just yet. This rules out an Ironman distance triathlon as the concept of a marathon after everything else really doesn’t appeal. So I went looking for something else, possibly something on the bike.

Gravel riding has been growing in popularity for the last few years and the number of different specialist bikes available continues to increase. So that sounded like a good place to go looking. Also it was a cracking excuse to buy a new bike (n+1).

I was also looking to make it part of a proper holiday this year, like the trips to the US National Parks I’ve done in the past.

The Event

I’d seen a video‘s of people doing the Dirty Kanza and it is held up as one of the first and great gravel events. The event is based around the main 200mile event but they also run 350mile, 100mile and 50mile events.

Given off road riding was going to be new to me and furthest I’ve ridden so far in one go is about 140km I decided that 200miles (300+km) for the first time was probably pushing things a little too far, so I put an entry in the ballot for the 100mile event. Just after Christmas I was notified that I had a place, and the mad dash to get somewhere to stop for the weekend of the event started

The Bike

2017 Genesis Datum
2017 Genesis Datum

The LBS had an ex-demo Genesis Datum 20 going for a absolute steal of a price.

The Datum 20 is a carbon frame gravel bike with 700c wheels, hydraulic disk brakes and Shimano 105 group set. The 50-34 up front and 11-32 cassette should get me round most thing. I wanted to stick with mechanical gearing as DI2 would be just something else that could potentially go wrong out on the course and I’m not totally sold on the whole one-by concept just yet.

The first upgrade was set of Hunt wheels, I got a set of the Four Season Gravel rims and got the local wheel builder to assemble them with a PowerTap G3 rear hub. This was for 2 reasons, the first was because the standard wheels weren’t tubeless capable and secondly because I wanted a power meter to help train and to measure my effort for pacing during the event.

I had to get a shim for the rear brake caliper as the standard wheel came with a 140mm rear disc and the G3 hub only takes a 160mm. I also shod the new rims with 38mm Panaracer Gravel King SK tyres. The 38mm only just have enough clearance at the rear so I’ll be swapping them for some 35mm before I head to the US just in case the course is wet and ends up muddy.

Training

I’ve done pretty much all my riding on the road, so I knew I’d have to get used to riding on softer ground, both gravel and mud. But to get things kicked off I booked a week riding in the hills in Spain in February. I went with a company called Andalucian Cycling Experience. I’d been away with them before so knew what to expect, and had a great week covering over 420km and climbing nearly 9000m.

When I got back I started out with the local tow path on the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal and a few of the local bridle ways get used to the back end of the bike sliding around a bit.

The next step was out to the Forest of Dean to the Cannop Cycle Centre. Here they have a gravel track called the Family Trail which is just short of 15km.

Doing big sets of 2 laps in one direction followed by 2 laps in the other to stop it getting too repetitive made up good base. Getting out to the start early on a Saturday morning and getting 6 laps before breaking for some lunch and the trail started to get busier with families. It’s also helping with planning out me nutrition and hydration for the event (though it’s possibly going to be a lot hotter in Kansas)

I’ve also been sticking in some local events. The Cotswolds Cross Enduro Sportive was an absolute killer, with sections of riding down a running stream and other parts that were only really possible on a full suspension mountain bike

In between the big sets at the weekends I’ve been making sure I get in at least 2 or 3 sessions on the trainer on Zwift mixing it up between doing their planned workouts and racing (on a good day I can get in the top 3 of a short cat. C event).

Now the clocks have gone forward and it’s lighter in the evenings I’ll be trying to get out climbing the local hills before dinner.

The event is at the start of June so I better get back on the bike.

Contributing to OpenStreetMap

I had a day off on Monday, there were a couple of things I needed to get done and I just needed another day out of the office.

On the Sunday evening while working out what to do with the rest of the day I happened to be looking at the OpenStreetMap site for the area round my flat. I noticed that the latest set of roads for the second phase of the development hadn’t been included yet.

As it was
As it was

I use data from the OpenStreetMap project on my Garmin Edge 810 cycle computer to provide both maps and routing information (it’s free vs paying Garmin for map packages) so I really appreciate all the work that has gone into this project so I decided to have a look at how to contribute these new roads.

I knew that people tended to upload GPS data in the form of GPX files that then got used to build the maps. The best tool I had to record the GPS data was my Garmin Edge 810 so I decided to have a quick ride round the new roads.

Strava’s preview has dropped a lot of points, but the actual track looked more like this.

gpx trace

As well as using the 810 I put my Garmin Virb Camera on to record a video of the ride. I mainly did this to catch the street name signs so I could name things properly.

Signing up on the OpenStreetMap site was trivial, just fill in a username and email address, then click on the link in the email that was sent to verify the address. Now I had the option to upload the GPX file. From there I followed the instructions here and use the Potlatch 2 editor to overlay my GPX trace on the existing map. I then traced on the extension of Tinning Way and George Raymond Road and added Annealing Way. I need to go back over the video to double check the names of the other new roads so I can add them as well.

OpenStreetMap tiles get regenerated from time to time so after an hour or two my updates became visible to everybody else.

After adding new roads
After adding new roads

I’ll have to regenerate the maps for my Garmin Edge 810 sometime to see if it now directs me via these new roads when I set off on my next ride.