Tag Archives: mobile

The quest for a IPv6 capable mobile data plan

For the last few weeks I’ve been trying to find a UK Mobile data provider that will provide a IPv6 address (well, hopefully a bunch of them that I can share round a few devices, but given how IPv6 normally works this should be trivial).

The reason I want this is because I’m playing with VoIP and SIP at home and I want a reliable way to be able to do direct point to point routing without having to resort to a VPN constantly running on my test devices. While my ISP (the wonderful A&A) have recently started handing out /29 and /30 subnets to make this sort of thing easier for IPV4 most mobile providers don’t provide a routable IP address, they all use CGNAT.

Currently the only major player that claims to support IPv6 is EE. I had a quick search online and found a bunch of forum posts from mid 2017 saying that they had started to roll it out, but only to new pay monthly customers. Given it is now approaching mid 2018 I thought things must have moved on a little but I couldn’t actually find anything more up to date anywhere on line. Having poked around on EE’s website none of the plan information mentions IPv6.

I called into one of EE’s retail stores and had a chat with the staff who didn’t really understand what I was asking for (to be fair it is a bit of a technical question compared to what they normally get asked), but I did manage to convince one of them to disconnect from the WiFi and get android to list their addresses. This showed a IPv6 address so things were looking up.

At a bit of a loss I called EE’s customer service team to see if they could tell me which plan I should pick, the Level 1 agent couldn’t help so passed me to Level 2, unfortunately they weren’t much help either and the best they could suggest was to get hold of a SIM and try.

Since the EE website offers sim cards for free I decided to try and order one and give it a go. At which point I ran into the next problem, the order form is not RFC2822 compliant. Meaning that it will not allow you to include tags in email addresses e.g. foo+ee@example.com where the +ee is a tag allowing you to identify who you gave the email address to.

After a little back and forth with EE’s social media team they managed to arrange to send me the Pay & Go Data (Tablet & 4GEE WiFi) SIM I was trying to order and hopefully pass to issue on to their web development team (to be fair validating email addresses is near impossible, which is why you shouldn’t even try).

Given this was explicitly a data SIM I was hopeful it would get a usable address. After topping up £10 to activate the sim and using that to buy £5 200mb data bundle I fired things up and crossed my fingers. And no joy, so back to having to run VPN tunnels on all my devices to effectively put them on my home network.

In conclusion is the IPv6 is basically still not available to the UK mobile data market.

Taking a look at the neighbourhood

A recent article about detecting offline social networks from information about preferred WIFI networks leaked by mobile devices led me to have another look at the work I’d done looking at WIFI location detection to see what other information I could derive.

I had been having problems with finding WIFI adapters with the right chipsets to allow me to use them in monitor mode in order to capture all the available packets from different networks, but recent updates to some of the WIFI drivers in the Linux kernel have enabled some more of the devices I have access to.

Previously I build a small application which works with the Kismet wireless scanner application to publish details of each device spotted to a MQTT topic tree. With a small modification it now also published the data about the WIFI networks that are being searched for.

Then using 2 simple Node-RED flows this data is stored into a MongoDB instance

You can have a look at the flow here.

From the device’s MAC address it is possible to determine the manufacture, so with another little node application to query the MongoDB store I can generate this d3js view of what type of devices are in use in the area round my flat.

The view dynamically updates every 5 seconds to pick up the latest information.

Now I know who owns what type of device, time to see who might know who. By plotting a force directed graph of all the clients detected and linking them based on the networks they have been searching for I can build up a view of which devices may belong to people who know each other.

Force directed network graph

There are a couple of clusters in the data so far, but most of them are from public WIFI networks like BTOpenzone and O2 Wifi. After filtering these services out there was still the 3 devices that look to be using Mike’s Lumina 800 for internet access and 4 devices connected to the same Sky Broadband router. I expect the data to be a lot more interesting when I get to run it somewhere with a few more people.

At the moment this is all running on my laptop, but it should run fine on my raspberry pi or my home server, as soon as I’ve transferred it over I’ll put a link up to live version of the charts.